Ross Emmett

Videos

Most of the videos posted here also appear on my Vimeo channel.
Creative Commons licenses exist for each video; you may inquire about using parts of those for which derivative works are allowed by contacting me at “Ross[at]rossbemmett.com”

Frank H. Knight on Democracy as Discussion from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

Over the last thirty years of his life, the Chicago economist Frank H. Knight concentrated his efforts on the elaboration of a new liberalism for the post-war era. Three things were necessary, he argued, to restore health to liberalism. First, free society required an appreciation for the basic economic principles of a free market economy, and of their limitations as guides to action. Secondly, democratic society needed to recognize the benefits and limitations of political solutions to social problems. Democratic action was essentially government by discussion, and hence the potential for persuasion, fraudulent speech and salesmanship should be recognized alongside the acceptance of the exploratory nature of all social action. Finally, a free society required free and responsible individuals, which meant that liberalism needed an independent conception of the ethics of freedom.

The dilemma of Knight’s theory of liberalism is that his three-fold conception of liberalism stalled on his inability to articulate how liberalism could generate an independent conception of ethics. Thus, while he raised key issues regarding the prospects of free societies, he could not settle the fundamental question of whether “human nature has what it takes to solve the problems … raised by its liberation” (Knight, Intelligence and Democratic Action, p. 141).

Date: November 9, 2011. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

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Frank H. Knight on Democracy as Discussion by Michigan State University and Ross B. Emmett is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
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TEDx Lansing Talk: “Innovation As an Act of Love,” May 21, 2010, Pasant Theatre, Wharton Center, Michigan State University.

You’ll find the other TEDx Lansing talks on the TEDx Lansing YouTube Playlist

Here is the Prezi that accompanied my TEDx Talk. By the way, during the presentation I forgot to zoom out at the end to show the whole Prezi, so you can only see that here!

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 1: Why “Picking Winners” Robs Us All of a Better Future from Ross Emmett on Vimeo

Date: September 14, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

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Lecture 1 of The Constitution of Innovation is licensed by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available; visit rossbemmett.com.

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 2: National Innovation Systems: Too “National”; Not “Constitutional” from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

Date: September 14, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

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Lecture 2 of The Constitution of Innovation by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
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The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 3: The Promise of Failure from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

The third lecture in the Constitution of Innovation series examines several key issues regarding innovative societies from the perspective of their capacity to handle failure. If innovation is finding new ways to use things to create value for others, then the opposite of failure is not success as we often define it — making it, reaching the top, etc. In an innovative society, competition always pushes the successful to keep moving; you’re only as good as your next innovation. An innovative society rewards value creation, but needs to do so in ways that make your reward for creating value proportionate to the value you create for others. Because successful innovation almost always follows failures, an innovative society has to ensure that people are both penalized for not creating value for others, and have the ability to recover and try again.

Date: September 21, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

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Constitution of Innovation: Lecture 3 by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
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The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 4: Co-creation from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

Innovation is not the result of the lone inventor, but of collaborative creativity, or co-creation. But what is required institutionally and culturally to foster collaborative innovation?

Date: September 21, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

Creative Commons License
The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 4 by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at rossbemmett.com.

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 5: From a Knowledge Economy to an Innovation Society from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

We live in an information-rich and knowledge-based economy. That fact has prompted many to suggest that enhancing our knowledge base, creating knowledge intensive industries, and devoting ourselves to a knowledge economy would be the best way to secure our future. But this mistakes a special resource — knowledge — for the long-term basis of economic growth — innovation. If we think about an innovation society as a society that is fundamentally oriented towards trying to create collaborative creativity which will generate innovations that add value to ordinary people’s lives then just being satisfied with a knowledge economy will limit our potential to be an innovative society.

Date: September 28, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

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The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 5: From a Knowledge Economy to a Innovation Society by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at rossbemmett.com.

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 6: Institutions and the Intangibles of an Innovative Society from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

After looking at principles and basic institutions in the earlier videos, it’s time to talk about some other features of innovative societies. We can call these intangibles, because they are not as identifiable as the institutions, but they also are not cultural factors. I identify these 5 of these intangibles, and talk in particular about networks, opportunities and hot spots.

Date: September 28, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

Creative Commons License
The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 6: Institutions and the Intangibles of an Innovative Society by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.msu.edu/~emmettr.

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 7: Innovation & Entrepreneurship from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

What’s the connection between entrepreneurship and innovation? And how does it matter for fostering an innovative society?

Date: October 5, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

Creative Commons License
The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 7: Innovation & Entrepreneurship by Michigan State University is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at rossbemmett.com.

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 8: The Constitution of Liberty & the Constitution of Innovation from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

What is the connection between a free society and an innovative society? My lecture series occurred on the 50th anniversary of F.A. Hayek’s The Constitution of Liberty. The 8th lecture examines the connections between Hayek’s conception of a free society and innovation.

Date: October 5, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

Creative Commons License
The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 8: The Constitution of Liberty & the Constitution of Innovation by Michigan State University is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at rossbemmett.com.

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 9: Intellectual Property and Innovation from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

I am not an intellectual property lawyer, I’m not an expert on intellectual property, I’m not an economist on intellectual property particularly and hence my goal is not to make declarative statements about what we should do in legislation regarding intellectual property but to think about the kind of constitutional questions and the kind of balances that are involved in thinking about the relationship between innovation and intellectual property law.

Date: October 12, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

Creative Commons License
The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 9: Intellectual Property and Innovation by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at rossbemmett.com.

The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 10: Innovation & Social Values from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

Question I am sometimes asked is this: “Innovation is a great thing and we would love to have it but what if we have to sacrifice other things we value for the sake of innovation, is it worth it? Should we be doing that? What about social justice, equality, etc.?” I want to give two responses to the question. One is going to focus upon the capacity of an innovative society to fulfill a multitude of social values not just the value of innovation. The second one is going to be to talk a little bit about what is sometimes called social entrepreneurship — the innovative activities of directly addressing the creation or enhancement of social values through a variety of activities.

Date: October 12, 2009, MC 390: Advanced Topics in Public Affairs — Comparative Political Economy and the Foundations of Innovative Society, James Madison College, Michigan State University. Filmed at the MSU Podcast Studio.

Creative Commons License
The Constitution of Innovation, Lecture 10: Innovation & Social Values by Ross B. Emmett is licensed by Michigan State University under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at rossbemmett.com.

Innovation is an Act of Love, and other comments on Love and Justice from Ross Emmett on Vimeo.

Date: January 28, 2010, Forum on the Moral Case for Capitalism, James Madison College, Michigan State University.

Creative Commons License
Innovation in an Act of Love by Ross B. Emmett is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
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